Skip navigation

research

Informing a research agenda for the Canadian chiropractic profession

January 10, 2018

Our research group recently published a Delphi study that identified Canadian chiropractic profession research priority areas. At the same time, the Canadian Chiropractic Research Foundation (CCRF) was developing their own research priority areas. In this commentary, we discuss the results of the Delphi study, compare and contrast these results to the research priorities of the

Read More

Research resource environment in Canada. Gathering knowledge in advance to inform chiropractic research priorities

January 10, 2018

Objective: To better understand the research resources and environment within the Canadian chiropractic profession. Methods: All members of the Canadian Chiropractic Association (n=7200) were invited to access an electronic survey on research capacity, activity, and resources. Canadian chiropractic stakeholder organizations received an invitation to participate in a related survey. Results: 505 CCA members completed the

Read More

Beyond the Spine: A New Clinical Research Priority

March 01, 2015

Over the past two decades, clinical research within the chiropractic profession has focused on the spine and spinal conditions, specifically neck and low back pain. However, there is now a small group of chiropractors with clinical research training that are shifting their focus away from traditional research pursuits towards new and innovative areas. Specifically, these researchers are now delving into areas such

Read More

An annotated bibliography on single subject research design

July 09, 2014

Selected citations of texts and journal literature were reviewed and annotated. The strategy of single subject research design is set out and reviewed within the annotated template. (JCCA 1995; 39(4):226-230) Key Words: research, design, chiropractic, manipulation. Des citations de textes et de revues choisies ont été analysées et commentées. La stratégie de méthode de recherche

Read More

Plastination: a modern approach to chiropractic teaching

July 07, 2014

Plastination is a unique method for the preservation of biological material for teaching and research. The plastinated specimens are dry, odorless, non-toxic and durable. They can be manipulated by teachers and students without protective equipment like gloves. Invented in 1978 by Doctor Gunther von Hagens from the University of Heidelberg, this technique, that involves the

Read More

back to top